100 days at Post: Flowers in La Paz…

Celebrating our first 100 days in Bolivia – our current post assignment, our home.

New life brings new expectations… Here’s what we’re seeing throughout the city of La Paz and its surroundings:
“Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in written words.  They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved by all men for the beauty of their character, though few can decipher even fragments of their meaning”.  Lydia M. Child

“Pluck not the wayside flower;
It is the traveler’s dower”.
William Allingham

“For myself I hold no preferences among flowers, so long as they are wild, free, spontaneous.  Bricks to all greenhouses!  Black thumb and cutworm to the potted plant!”  Edward Abbey

my sweet little budding girl…
…from seedlings, they’re now all grown!

“The flowers of late winter and early spring occupy places in our hearts well out of proportion to their size”.  Gertrude S. Wister

“Every flower is a soul blossoming in nature”.  Gerard de Nerval

“The artist is the confidant of nature, flowers carry on dialogues with him through the graceful bending of their stems and the harmoniously tinted nuances of their blossoms. Every flower has a cordial word which nature directs towards him”. Auguste Rodin

“Flowers have an expression of countenance as much as men or animals. Some seem to smile; some have a sad expression; some are pensive and diffident; others again are plain, honest and upright, like the broad-faced sunflower and the hollyhock”.  Henry Ward Beecher


“Perfumes are the feelings of flowers, and as the human heart, imagining itself alone and unwatched, feels most deeply in the night-time, so seems it as if the flowers, in musing modesty, await the mantling eventide ere they give themselves up wholly to feeling, and breathe forth their sweetest odours. Flow forth, ye perfumes of my heart, and seek beyond these mountains the dear one of my dreams!” Heinrich Heine

Urban Beauty Photography: Flowers along the Streets of La Paz.

Pluck not the wayside flower;
It is the traveler’s dower.
~William Allingham

Celebrating our first month in Bolivia – our new post assignment, our new home. New life brings new expectations… Here’s what we’re seeing:
“Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in written words.  They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved by all men for the beauty of their character, though few can decipher even fragments of their meaning”.  Lydia M. Child

“Pluck not the wayside flower;
It is the traveler’s dower”.
William Allingham

 

“For myself I hold no preferences among flowers, so long as they are wild, free, spontaneous.  Bricks to all greenhouses!  Black thumb and cutworm to the potted plant!”  Edward Abbey

“The flowers of late winter and early spring occupy places in our hearts well out of proportion to their size”.  Gertrude S. Wister

“Every flower is a soul blossoming in nature”.  Gerard de Nerval

“The artist is the confidant of nature, flowers carry on dialogues with him through the graceful bending of their stems and the harmoniously tinted nuances of their blossoms. Every flower has a cordial word which nature directs towards him”. Auguste Rodin

“Flowers have an expression of countenance as much as men or animals. Some seem to smile; some have a sad expression; some are pensive and diffident; others again are plain, honest and upright, like the broad-faced sunflower and the hollyhock”.  Henry Ward Beecher


“Perfumes are the feelings of flowers, and as the human heart, imagining itself alone and unwatched, feels most deeply in the night-time, so seems it as if the flowers, in musing modesty, await the mantling eventide ere they give themselves up wholly to feeling, and breathe forth their sweetest odours. Flow forth, ye perfumes of my heart, and seek beyond these mountains the dear one of my dreams!” Heinrich Heine

Plant Nursery Photography: A visit to the ‘Vivero de Aranjuez’ in La Paz.

New country. New home. A brand new garden to work on! ♥ And believe me: there’s a great deal of gardening to be done before our front yard gets to where we’d like it to be – full with native plants, adapted to the high altitude, able to endure the cold and dry weather, and yet, displaying colorful plants, flowers, and trees. Soon we’ll be sharing images of our newest project: The Miranda Garden! For now, my main responsibility is bringing it back to life, finding new seedlings for transplant, planting, and, with the help of our newly hired gardener, offer the yard a lot of TLC!

Detail, from a coffee plant

New country. New home. A brand new garden to work on! ♥ And believe me: there’s a great deal of gardening to be done before our front yard gets to where we’d like it to be – full with native plants, adapted to the high altitude, able to endure the cold and dry weather, and yet, displaying colorful plants, flowers, and trees. Soon we’ll be sharing images of our newest project: The Miranda Garden! For now, my main responsibility is bringing it back to life, finding new seedlings for transplant, planting, and, with the help of our newly hired gardener, offer the yard a lot of TLC!

I’m a planner. I live by ‘lists’. Maybe I’m even a controller… hard to say… [my husband should be the one to address that!]. Anyway, my very first chore was a visit to one of the best-known plant nurseries in town: The Vivero de Aranjuez.

Over 180 different species of plants. Most of the workers are women, who take pride on what they do, and claim to understand more about plants than any man would…

Fuchsias, daisies, calla lilies, geranius, coffee plants, palm trees, gerberas… you name it! And I brought them all back home… gotta get the Project started!

Here are images from our visit (baby girl also came): Click on the image to see it blossom! Enjoy!♥