RSS

Category Archives: Brasilia

64 weeks at Post. Great bidding victory – we got our #1 choice [again]!

We’re a couple of months into our second year at Post, and we’ve enjoyed every bit of it.

Soon we’ll have news to share: The Mirandas are going to their #1 Choice – once again – hard to believe! The stress is over, and now, we oughta begin looking into our future – gotta love the Foreign Service – never a dull moment!

No, not sharing much at this time… Just wanna leave these images here… maybe it’s a clue?  :o

greenpeace

caldinho

Let’s just wait and see… :o

About these ads
 
 

Tags: ,

[Weekly Photo Challenge: Geometry] The singular city of Brasília, where architecture and mysticism meet.

[Backstory] Geometry. This challenge is about the shapes and rhythms that make up the geometry of our world. Many photographs of any genre have an underlying sense of geometry, but I often like to make this the main subject of my work. I think it’s the most important aspect of a photograph’s success. This could be the patterns of the natural world up close and personal, or the rhythm of your local buildings. The above photograph, “Positive Negative,” depicts the Paula Rego Museum in Lisbon where the sky created an equally strong element of the composition as the building. The image has a totemic quality, softened by the passing cloud. I had waited for this cloud to move into the perfect position within the frame. The colour, light, and form of the image emphasize this geometry.

Share a photo that means GEOMETRY to you!

Tip: Once you have found a good subject that contains an interesting geometry, try to crop tightly into the subject to make an unexpected composition. Your goal should be to create an abstract composition so the image is more about underlying shapes than a literal representation of the subject matter itself — by doing this you create art rather than a snapshot.

Brasilia cathedral

Image Source (left): “aboutBrasilia.com” Brasilia is without any doubt a singular city, different from all others; even those ones considered moderns and planned.

For such special city, an equally singular Cathedral was designed and built. On 12th September 1958, the Cathedral’s cornerstone was laid. The Metropolitan Cathedral of Brasilia is an expression of the geniality of the architect Oscar Niemeyer. In 1960, the Cathedral’s structure was finished, and only the 70 m diameter of the circular area and the 16 concrete columns were visible. These columns, having parabolic section and weighing 90 t, represent two hands moving upwards to heaven. The Cathedral was dedicated on the 31st May, 1970. At that time it had already the external transparent window. Four bronze sculptures 3 m high, representing the Evangelists, can be seen at the external square in the entrance of the Temple. These sculptures were made with the help of the sculptor Dante Croce, in 1968. Inside the nave, three sculptures of angels are suspended by steel cables.


The smallest angel has 2,22 m of length and weighs 100 kg. The medium one has 3,40 m of length and weighs 200 kg. The big one has 4,25 m of length and 300 kg weighs. The sculptures were made by Alfredo Ceschiatti, with the help of Dante Croce, in 1970. The nave stained glass is made of 16 pieces of fibreglass. These pieces, in colours of blue, white and brown, were fixed between the concrete columns, in triangles of 10 m of base and 30 m of height. They were painted in 1990 by Marianne Peretti. Having an oval form, the Baptistery has its walls covered by a panel of ceramic tiles painted in 1977 by Athos Bulcão. The local architecture is completed by a bell tower. Its four big bells were donated by Spain.

 
29 Comments

Posted by on November 2, 2012 in ART, Brasilia, photography, TRAVEL

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Open Government Partnership in Brasília, city where architecture, mysticism, and government meet.

This past week, husband had the opportunity to enjoy its perfect architecture, while facing very long working days at the Capital, a lot happened in Brasília during this past week, including the meetings for the Open Government Partnership.

From the partnership goals: “It takes political leadership. It takes technical knowledge. It takes sustained effort and investment. It takes collaboration between governments and civil society. The Open Government Partnership is a new multilateral initiative that aims to secure concrete commitments from governments to promote transparency, empower citizens, fight corruption, and harness new technologies to strengthen governance. In the spirit of multi-stakeholder collaboration, OGP is overseen by a steering committee of governments and civil society organizations. To become a member of OGP, participating countries must embrace a high-level Open Government Declaration; deliver a country action plan developed with public consultation; and commit to independent reporting on their progress going forward.
 The Open Government Partnership formally launched on September 20, 2011, when the 8 founding governments (Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Norway, Philippines, South Africa, United Kingdom, United States) endorsed an Open Government Declaration, and announced their country action plans. Since September, OGP has welcomed the commitment of 43 additional governments to join the Partnership.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

More about the theme, from other bloggers:
 
7 Comments

Posted by on April 23, 2012 in Brasilia, photography, post a day

 

Tags: , , ,

The singular city of Brasília, where architecture, mysticism, and government meet. First stop: Metropolitan Cathedral

I’d stated before my deep admiration for this city. Unique and beautiful, in every single way. Brasília is part of who I am, and who I’ll always be…

This past week, husband had the opportunity to enjoy its perfect architecture, while  facing very long working days at the Capital, but this talk will be left for an upcoming post – a lot happened in Brasília during this past week.

For now, I’m dedicating this series of posts to him, showing my deepest appreciation for this efforts in bringing back home (daytime & nightlight) pictures of my hometown, during his quite scarce free time… :o This first post will be about the dream of a visionary man, and the idea of constructing a cathedral resembling two hands together, reaching up…

Brasilia cathedral

Image Source (left): “aboutBrasilia.com” Brasilia is without any doubt a singular city, different from all others; even those ones considered moderns and planned.

For such special city, an equally singular Cathedral was designed and built. On 12th September 1958, the Cathedral’s cornerstone was laid. The Metropolitan Cathedral of Brasilia is an expression of the geniality of the architect Oscar Niemeyer. In 1960, the Cathedral’s structure was finished, and only the 70 m diameter of the circular area and the 16 concrete columns were visible. These columns, having parabolic section and weighing 90 t, represent two hands moving upwards to heaven. The Cathedral was dedicated on the 31st May, 1970. At that time it had already the external transparent window. Four bronze sculptures 3 m high, representing the Evangelists, can be seen at the external square in the entrance of the Temple. These sculptures were made with the help of the sculptor Dante Croce, in 1968. Inside the nave, three sculptures of angels are suspended by steel cables.


The smallest angel has 2,22 m of length and weighs 100 kg. The medium one has 3,40 m of length and weighs 200 kg. The big one has 4,25 m of length and 300 kg weighs. The sculptures were made by Alfredo Ceschiatti, with the help of Dante Croce, in 1970. The nave stained glass is made of 16 pieces of fibreglass. These pieces, in colours of blue, white and brown, were fixed between the concrete columns, in triangles of 10 m of base and 30 m of height. They were painted in 1990 by Marianne Peretti. Having an oval form, the Baptistery has its walls covered by a panel of ceramic tiles painted in 1977 by Athos Bulcão. The local architecture is completed by a bell tower. Its four big bells were donated by Spain.

 
23 Comments

Posted by on April 22, 2012 in ART, Brasilia, photography, post a day

 

Tags: , ,

52nd Anniversary of Brasilia, the city where everything meets, and the dream of JK, the visionary.

Continuing with the series of posts about the singular city of Brasilia, and again, very grateful for  all my husband’s efforts in bringing back home pictures of my hometown, during his time at the Federal Capital…Today, the City of Brasília, the “Capital of Hope” (Capital da Esperança, in Portuguese), as it’s known by all Brazilians, celebrates its 52nd Anniversary. One man, a visionary, was responsible for its creation/construction, a former President, Juscelino Kubitschek, known as President JK. This post is dedicated to his memory and the city of his dreams. Find below images from the JK memorial – the external building and its interior:

JK, in the words of another traveler, a contributor to Lonely Planet:

“The man had guts.. Moved the capital away from the mobsters, created a social system that worked – he had an unfortunate ‘accident’ that ended his life but cemented his legend. His visitors included much of S.America’s leaders, European heads of state, ministers of state of Canada and President Eisenhower of the USA. They came for the commodities, but remained friends for other reasons. Brazil has been an ally since before WWII and committed and lost mariners to support Western freedoms. Friends continue to remember who helped pay for the freedom. The collection of artifacts from JK’s and his wife, Sara’s personal effects and those items they touched in the course of their professional lives provide a colourful narrative of gentil and caring people intent on helping the people of Brazil. JK was a conservative man. His clothing demonstrates a focus on the essentials – not frivolity. Gifts to the president are similarly modest and suggest his support was not purchased but rather was what was important for the country at the time. Woven into the details about JK – the man, is the story of the design and creation of Brasilia. Evolving sketches, photo images document many of the design choices made by the Niemeyer team, who purpose built each of the major components of the city’s buildings, roads and services. JK lays entombed in granite on the second floor of the museum, surrounded by a stone rotunda where visitors can enter and pause over the man who created the new Brazil. In contrast to the rest of the dramatic exhibit, but in keeping with his nature, his resting place is solemn and remains reverent despite the comings and goings of many school children and tourists outside the rotunda. The JK Memorial is an essential part of a visit to Brasilia – a city that is completely different from any other and one that changed the perception of Brazil to the world.”

Read more about the Memorial here.

 
5 Comments

Posted by on April 21, 2012 in ART, Brasilia, photography, post a day

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
The Greene & The Miranda Families

a personal genealogy weblog

from laura, with love

life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.

theloneshewolf

I'm really not sure yet

jessicasanesm's Blog

Deja que el sol ilumine las palabras que no puedes encontrar!!

Catching Up With Daphne

Expect the Unexpected

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,810 other followers

%d bloggers like this: